Top 5 things I will miss about Delhi

I’m all set to go to Edinburgh and begin my course, this time next week, I will have reached. I have no idea how my life will fit into two suitcases, but I hope to figure out soon. So here we go about the top 5 things I will miss about Delhi (I have been here for 2 yrs 8 months now), in order of increasing importance…

Number 5

The Delhi charm! The city. The absolute bling that only Delhi can be, from the sparkling choodas on most Punjabi hands to the absolute disregard for any kind of rule or law. The red light jumping, the not-free left taking, the rickshaw, the auto, and in general the complete madness!

Number 4

My workplace… at STMicroelectronics. It was almost always good, sometimes nasty, but it has been a helluva ride. I have learnt and taught others; I have faltered and succeeded, and it was very hard to leave behind the long saga of the reason I ended up in Delhi.

The Sexy Campus!

Number 3

The Noida-Greater Noida Expressway. My daily commute to work, oh what a gorgeous road. I loved the rolling fields in the monsoons and the way we used to peer along at 40 kmph in the winter fog. I will miss the long conversations with V and the McD breakfast on the go. The winding roads, nostalgia…

On a crisp January morning

Number 2

My lovely lovely home, where I put up for but 10 months. It was the nicest place I have stayed in so far. I had my books, my clothes, a beautiful space, and a very comfortable room in a flat. It has been one of the few places I have lived in that I can imagine staying in for years together, cozy and snug.

Number 1

K. My love, my flatmate, my soul sister. She is my twin from a parallel universe. We think alike, we talk alike, we read each other’s minds. We say the same things together, invariably, always. K has been a rock solid support, a brilliant friend, a caring flatmate, and basically the awesomest person ever! If there was anything that would’ve kept me in India, it was her.

U & K

The Firangi Factor

 

  1. They get stared, jeered, hooted at…
  2. Men point at them, make lewd gestures, mumble trash…
  3. Street urchins have been known to smack them (happened to Emma, a friend of Maegan’s who’d come to visit)…
  4. Soaring temperatures and constant humidity makes them uncomfortable and tired…
  5. Mosquitoes sniff them out no matter what and leave their skin cratered and pained…
  6. Dust and mosquito repellant smog leaves their hair frizzy and eyes red…
  7. They get ripped off by drivers…
  8. They have to live with horrible/ weird/ dirty females, if on a budget…
  9. Foreigner registrations are usually a nightmare…
  10. The general opinions and stares of random people follow them wherever they go…

I’m sure I’ve missed points.

They come from well respected, protective, beautiful families just like ours. Their mums and dads are just as concerned as ours are. They have never had to endure this kind of treatment in their lives.

And yet. Yet, in all the while that I have known Maegan or Susanna, have I known them to be complaining and/or bitter. Never will they make a face about sitting underneath a fan, without the comfort of an AC. Never will they be grumpy about going out in the searing heat. Never will they be bitter about walking instead of taking a rickshaw. Give them a ride and they will thank you profusely to the point of embarrassment (keeps happening with M and V)…

They smile, wrestle with their Hindi, take everything in their stride, write humorous blog posts out of painful incidents, and be happy. I have met way more spoilt females… hell, even I am used to more comforts than Maegan!

What is it that makes them this nice? This tolerant? It seems so difficult for me to keep my cool when I am stared at, and I am in my own country… these two make it seem effortless. Surely it is not easy, surely… it is a mystery to me.

There is a lot to learn from you two (cutely crazy) ‘gori’s